Don’t want a hybrid? Edmunds picks SUVs that will still save you money at the pump

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Driving a new SUV and saving money at the pump is possible, and you don’t need to get a hybrid or electric vehicle. From small crossovers to large traditional SUVs, there are fuel-efficient models on sale now that don’t require paying a premium for electrification.

Based on official fuel economy ratings set by the Environmental Protection Agency, the five SUV models listed below are tops in their class for gas mileage. They’re all also available with all-wheel drive or four-wheel drive to enhance traction in foul weather driving. Edmunds’ car experts dive into what stands out about each. The listed pricing includes destination charges.

Extra-Small SUV: Toyota Corolla Cross

With an SUV body style and Corolla mechanicals, the Toyota Corolla Cross is one of the most popular small SUVs you can buy. Pleasingly, that extra interior space doesn’t come at the expense of fuel economy because this crossover gets up to an EPA-estimated 32 mpg in combined driving. A 169-horsepower four-cylinder engine moves the metal, and there is up to 24 cubic feet of cargo space behind the Corolla Cross’ back seat. All-wheel drive is available on every trim level.

2024 Corolla Cross starting price: $25,210

Small SUV: Nissan Rogue

You have plenty to choose from when buying a small SUV. But at the top of the class of models, excluding hybrids, is the Nissan Rogue. Equipped with a standard turbocharged three-cylinder engine, the Rogue gets up to an EPA-estimated 33 mpg in combined driving. That engine is small and efficient but mighty, supplying 201 horsepower and plenty of torque. In addition, the Rogue provides up to 36.5 cubic feet of cargo space behind the back seat.

2024 Nissan Rogue starting price: $30,240

Midsize SUV: Subaru Outback

Almost three decades ago, Subaru introduced the Outback. Among midsize SUVs with five-passenger seating, the latest Outback rules the roost, getting up to an EPA-estimated 28 mpg in combined driving with its standard all-wheel-drive system. If the thrifty 182-horsepower four-cylinder engine isn’t powerful enough for you, you can get a turbocharged Outback, but it won’t be as efficient or affordable. Outbacks offer 32.6 cubic feet of cargo space behind the back seat.

2025 Subaru Outback starting price: $30,290

Midsize Three-Row SUV: Kia Sorento

When you need a third-row seat, a midsize SUV can deliver the extra passenger capacity you seek without the price premium of a full-size model. The Kia Sorento is the most fuel-efficient member of the three-row midsizers club, getting up to an EPA-estimated 26 mpg in combined driving from a 191-horsepower four-cylinder engine. A turbocharged powerplant is available, but it costs more to buy and fuel. Behind its second-row seat, the Sorento provides a minimum of 38.5 cubic feet of cargo space. All-wheel drive is either optional or standard on most Sorento trim levels.

2024 Kia Sorento starting price: $33,365

Full-size SUV: Chevrolet Tahoe

It’s a big SUV but some versions of the Chevy Tahoe get up to an impressive 24 mpg in combined driving. You’ll need to pay extra for the turbocharged diesel engine to achieve that kind of mileage in this eight-passenger full-size SUV. How much more? Happily, it’s an affordable $995 option. In addition to its impressive efficiency, the Duramax engine supplies 277 horsepower — or 305 horsepower for the 2025 Tahoe — and plenty of torque for towing. Behind the Tahoe’s second-row seat, you’ll find a generous 72.6 cubic feet of cargo space. Four-wheel drive is available for every Tahoe trim level.

2024 Chevrolet Tahoe starting price: $59,190, including the diesel engine upgrade

EDMUNDS SAYS

Are there more efficient SUVs than these? Yes, but you’ll need a hybrid or plug-in hybrid to beat the five models above. Among the gas-fueled (and diesel) models available for the 2024 model year, these are the best SUVs to save you money at the pump.

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This story was provided to The Associated Press by the automotive website Edmunds.

Christian Wardlaw is a contributor at Edmunds.

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